Scottish Episcopal places of worship interactive map

I’m excited to launch my interactive map of every Scottish Episcopal place of worship ever, from 1689-2021.

This project to list and geolocate all places of worship began around 2015 with a plan to provide some visualised data for a book I was planning on this topic. Hopefully I can now get back to the book!

How to use the map

The map can be opened in a new window from this link

You can zoom and pan around the map, and click on points to see more details. Entries described as ‘closed: 2021’ are churches open at the time of publication.

Sharp dots mark exact locations; fuzzy blobs show places of worship which could not be precisely geolocated. The key is on the right, but can be seen under ‘map and tools’ > ‘layers and legend’ > episcopal churches gis > hover over the small rectangle.

Exploring the data

It is interesting to find the exact locations of closed churches on google street view (or on the ground) as some buildings have been repurposed while others have disappeared without trace.

On my computer I can see all churches open in a certain year, or select only buildings of a certain type, which unfortunately the online app doesn’t support. However, here are a couple of screenshots of this kind of selected data:

School churches and iron/ wood churches in the Scottish Episcopal Church
Timeline of Scottish episcopal places of worship, 1689-2021

Please let me know at eleanormharris@gmail.com if you spot any inaccuracies on the map, or can supply additional data, such as precise locations.

Acknowledgements

I am very grateful to David Bertie, whose book Scottish Episcopal Clergy supplied most of the initial information on long-lost meeting houses; and to Canon Allan Maclean who gave me his database of church buildings as a starting point. This was supplemented by a great deal of hunting on NLS historic maps and local church and history websites to pinpoint the exact locations of former churches.

Places

The following places of worship are linked from the map, providing more information and photographs:

Auchindoir

Back to main Scottish Episcopal place of worship map page Church website (external link) Auchindoir’s places of worship were: 1a. Rhynie (1689-1716) Location 1b. Kildrummy (1689-1717) Location 2. Meeting house (1717-1745) 3. Clova (1745-1858) 4. St Mary (1858-present) Visited 2 April 2021. Stone church by William Ramage of Aberdeen. Location

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Scottish Episcopal places of worship interactive map

I’m excited to launch my interactive map of every Scottish Episcopal place of worship ever, from 1689-2021. This project to list and geolocate all places of worship began around 2015 with a plan to provide some visualised data for a book I was planning on this topic. Hopefully I can now get back to the … Continue reading “Scottish Episcopal places of worship interactive map”

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